top of page
Search

Your skin & heart are more connected than you think



Your skin & heart are more connected than you think

Taking care of your skin is far from superficial. Your skin is a reflection of your overall health, after all, some complexion concerns are very indicative of deep-rooted issues (like hormonal imbalance, digestive challenges etc.)


The link between skin & heart health


‘Inflammation’ has become a bit of a nebulous term these days, but chronic inflammation really is the core of all unwelcome health concerns, including cardiovascular disease. And guess what? Skin inflammation can translate into general inflammation in the body.


A 2019 study has even demonstrated a link between skin dysfunction and various health conditions caused by chronic inflammation.


Research has shown that more intense skin conditions (like eczema and psoriasis) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular issues, likely due to inflammation in the body. But according to board-certified dermatologist Cynthia Bailey, M.D., skin concerns don't have to be that severe to potentially lead to cardiovascular issues down the road.


"Simple skin barrier weakening associated with age has been found to increase circulating blood markers of inflammation," she explains. (It's a concept called inflammaging.) "The common—and big—age-related health issues, such as heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's, are also associated with an increase in these markers of inflammation."


In the aforementioned 2019 study, researchers found that using barrier repair moisturisers could actually reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood.

And remember, your skin is your largest organ. It works to protect other organs in your body, including the heart.


Below the surface of the skin is a fat layer that protects your bones, nerves, and circulatory system from extreme heat and cold. It also provides protective padding from impacts and helps store energy like a battery. When your skin barrier weakens, that layer becomes more vulnerable to external aggressors, which could also explain why your cardiovascular and skin health are so intertwined.


What comes first: skin concerns or heart issues?


"As a clinician, I've noticed in my 35 years of practice that middle-aged to elderly patients with dry skin are often also likely to have health problems, such as heart disease, and be on prescriptions for diuretics and statins—signs of high blood pressure and higher than average cardiovascular risk factors that require treatment," Bailey shares.


It raises the question: Did the patients' dry skin play a role in setting up those heart problems, or did the inflammation already present results in drier skin over time? Or did the medications themselves simply lead to dryness? It becomes a classic ‘chicken and egg’ situation that research can't quite decipher.


How to strengthen your skin barrier—and protect your heart.


So in addition to traditional methods to optimise heart health—regular cardio exercise, a balanced diet full of omega-3s etc, skin barrier support must be worthwhile. Keep your skin as nourished as possible, with hydrating moisturisers that include a blend of humectants, emollients, and occlusives to properly attract and trap moisture.


Taking care of your skin is far from superficial. Your skin is a reflection of your overall health, after all, some complexion concerns are very indicative of deep-rooted issues (like hormonal imbalance, digestive challenges etc.)


The Vintage Avenue Team x






2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page